Advertisement

Corporate Evolution in the Service Industries

  • Derek F. Channon

Abstract

Today the economies of developed countries are no longer primarily concerned with manufacturing industry. While the production of manufactured goods remains an essential feature, the largest sector of the modern economy is the service industries. Yet surprisingly the vast majority of the attention devoted to economic policy by politicians, economists. and management theorists is concerned with the relatively declining manufacturing sector. Indeed, while specific service sectors have merited investigation, no major study of the strategic management problems of these industries has been attempted. Further, many politicians, economists, and the like seem not only unable to recognise the importance of the service sector, but to consider that it is only investment in the manufacturing sector which essentially contributes to economic and thereby social development.

Keywords

Financial Service Cocoa Butter Service Industry Service Company Postwar Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 2.
    Bruce R. Scott, ‘Stages of Corporate Development’, unpublished paper (Harvard Business School, Boston, 1971 ).Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    See for example L. Wrigley, ‘Divisional Autonomy and Diversification’, unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard Business School, 1970.Google Scholar
  3. 3a.
    D. F. Channon, The Strategy and Structure of British Enterprise (Boston and London, 1973 ).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Alfred D. Chandler, Strategy and Structure (MIT Press, 1962 ).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    This process is described in detail in H. Chryssaphes, ‘The Evolution of the U.K. Clearing Banks 1950–72’, unpublished MBA dissertation (Manchester, 1974 ).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    For a description of why particular mergers occurred in this period see: D. Robinson, ‘Strategy and Structure in Merchant Banking’, unpublished working paper (Manchester, 1975) ch. 2.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Monopolies Commission, Report on Proposed Merger Between Barclays and Lloyds (HMSO, 1968).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek F. Channon

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations