Women’s Role in Employment

  • Brian Chiplin
  • Peter J. Sloane


Like most other developed economies Britain experienced an acceleration in the trend rate of growth in the number and proportion of married women in the work force in the decade up to 1970. Furthermore, in the more advanced countries generally the female labour force is expected to grow by 36 per cent (68 million) in the period 1970–2000, compared with a projected growth of 31 per cent in the male labour force,1 and Britain will share in this growth. However, over the 100 years between 1851 and 1951 the relative importance of women in the British labour force was remarkably constant. Census of population data show that women comprised approximately 30 per cent of the occupied population throughout the period. Despite this, however, there was a substantial increase in the number of women in the occupied population, which rose from 2.8 million to 7 million over the period and major fluctuations in this pattern occurred on account of the two World Wars.


Married Woman Female Employment Hourly Earning Occupational Distribution Earning Difference 


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  1. 10.
    See Jerolyn H. Lyle and Jane L. Ross, Women in Industry: Employment Patterns of Women in Corporate America ( Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath and Co., 1973 ).Google Scholar
  2. 11.
    See Valerie Oppenheimer, The Female Labour Force in the United States ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1970 ).Google Scholar
  3. 14.
    Rudolph C. Blitz, ‘Women in the Professions, 1870–1970’, Monthly Labour Review (May 1974).Google Scholar
  4. 24.
    Office of Manpower Economics, Incremental Payment Systems (HMSO, 1973).Google Scholar
  5. 30.
    D. McNulty, ‘Differences in Pay between Men and Women Workers’, Monthly Labour Review (Dec 1967).Google Scholar
  6. 31.
    J. Buckley, ‘Pay Differences between Men and Women in the Same Job’, Monthly Labour Review (Nov 1971).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Brian Chiplin and Peter J. Sloane 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Chiplin
  • Peter J. Sloane

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