Anatomy of marsupials

  • Robert A. Barbour
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Biology, Economy and Society book series

Abstract

Early studies often were made with the assumption that marsupials are fundamentally more primitive than eutherian mammals. Findings, however, show more similarities than differences and the differences do not always indicate two levels of evolutionary advancement but sometimes just different ways of dealing with the same biological problem. Current thought now tends to regard marsupials as representing an alternative rather than an inferior path in evolution. Among marsupials themselves there are marked differences related to the wide adaptive radiation they have undergone (see Wood Jones, 1923; Sharman, 1959a; Troughton, 1959), and they show a range of degrees of specialisation in various aspects of their morphology.

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© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Barbour

There are no affiliations available

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