Vocational electromyography: Investigation of power spectrum response to repeated test loadings during a day of work at the assembly line

  • R. Örtengren
  • H. Broman
  • R. Magnusson
  • G. B. J. Andersson
  • I. Petersen
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Sport Sciences book series (MMSS)

Abstract

It has been shown that the power spectrum of the myoelectric signal responds to sustained, strong, isometric contractions with an increase of low-frequency content and a decrease of high-frequency content (Kadefors, Kaiser, and Petersén, 1968). This corresponds to a shift of the spectrum toward lower frequencies (Lindström, Magnusson, and Petersén, 1970). This shift is consistent with a decrease of the impulse conduction velocity of the muscle fibers and has been attributed to an accumulation of acid metabolites in the muscle when blood flow is restricted by the contraction (Mortimer, Magnusson, and Petersén, 1970; Lindström et al., 1970).

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References

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Copyright information

© University Park Press 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Örtengren
    • 1
  • H. Broman
    • 1
  • R. Magnusson
    • 1
  • G. B. J. Andersson
    • 2
  • I. Petersen
    • 2
  1. 1.Chalmers University of TechnologyGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Sahlgren HospitalGöteborgSweden

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