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Abstract

Coffee is one of the most valuable commodities in international trade with an annual value of around $3,000 million in recent years. Unlike products such as rice and wheat, which are much more important in terms of global production but consumed mainly in the countries where grown, most coffee production is exported to countries other than those in which it is grown. Coffee illustrates the classic colonial trade relationship, as it is grown chiefly in the poor, formerly colonial areas of Latin America, Africa and Asia but consumed mainly in the rich, developed areas of North America, Europe and Japan.

Keywords

Coffee Bean Green Coffee Commodity Trade Brazilian Government Coffee Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Cheryl Payer 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl Payer

There are no affiliations available

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