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Determinants of Fertility: a Micro-economic Model of Choice

  • Paul Schultz
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

There are many explanations of why human fertility varies from one society to another and among different groups or individuals within the same society. Attempts to identify and measure the factors that affect fertility and hence to discriminate among current competing causal hypotheses have not been notably successful. This gap in our basic stock of knowledge is both a source of embarrassment to social scientists and an obstacle to the strategic formulation and tactical evaluation of population policies throughout the world.

Keywords

Ordinary Little Square Reproductive Behaviour Underdeveloped Country Population Policy Rand Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The International Economic Association 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Schultz
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaUSA

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