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Biomechanical Concepts and Effects

  • T. Gibson
  • J. C. Barbenel
  • J. H. Evans
Chapter
Part of the Strathclyde Bioengineering Seminars book series (BCSDA)

Summary

Superficial tissue ulceration can be caused by the effect of mechanical loads acting on localised areas of skin and subcutaneous tissues. Be they low sustained loads applied for long periods or higher loads intermittently applied, the importance of the time factor has been recognised clinically by doctors and nurses. The significance of the type of loading and its magnitude in the damage of tissue is, however, not well agreed. This is in part due to the fact that knowledge of the mechanical and physiological responses of tissues is limited and in part to an inability to measure the forces applied to the tissues.

This presentation outlines current understanding of the mechanics of tissue response.

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References

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Copyright information

© Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Gibson
  • J. C. Barbenel
  • J. H. Evans

There are no affiliations available

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