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The ‘Year of the Four Emperors’

  • M. Cary
  • H. H. Scullard

Abstract

The misgovernment of Nero’s later years did not bring about any sharp change of feeling in the provinces, where its effects were not immediately perceived. The people of Rome forgot its grudge against the emperor as soon as the traces of the great fire of 64 were removed. The Senate harboured resentment at the loss of many of its most prominent members, but so long as it was unsupported by public opinion or by military force it could make no overt move. But the soldiers who had made Nero emperor also had the power to unmake him.

Keywords

Military Force Imperial Power Overt Move Chief Officer Great Fire 
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Notes and References

  1. 6.
    On the campaigns of 68–69 see B. W. Henderson, Civil War and Rebellion in the Roman Empire (1908);Google Scholar
  2. P. A. L. Greenhalgh, The Year of the Four Emperors (1975);Google Scholar
  3. K. Wellesley, The Long Year (1975). It is estimated that Caecina’s corps numbered 40,000 men, that of Valens 30,000. Otho had about 25,000 troops at hand in Italy. Of the other armies which at first declared in his favour, the Danube forces amounted to some 75,000 men.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The representatives of the estate of the late M. Cary and H. H. Scullard 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Cary
    • 1
  • H. H. Scullard
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LondonUK

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