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Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus

  • M. Cary
  • H. H. Scullard

Abstract

The period of comparative calm through which Roman domestic politics had moved since the end of the Conflict of the Orders was brought to a close in 133 with the tribunate of Tiberius Gracchus. The following century was a period of almost continuous internal disorder, in the course of which the republican constitution was progressively disjointed and paralysed.

Keywords

Judicial Power Roman History Roman People Republican Constitution Roman Citizen 
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Notes and References

  1. The main sources on the Gracchi are Plutarch’s Lives and Appian’s Civil War, bk i. The most important passages from these two writers and from other sources are usefully collected for the period 133–70 B.c. in A. H. J. Greenidge, A. M. Clay and E. W. Gray, Sources for Roman History 133–70 B.C. (2nd edn, 1960).Google Scholar
  2. The triumviri agris iudicandis adsignandis were probably eligible for annual re-election; in fact they changed only when vacancies were caused by death. See J. Carcopino, Autour des Graccques (1928, 2nd edn 1967), 149 ff.Google Scholar
  3. Whether Tiberius introduced a law (Plutarch, On the contribution of archaeology to the agrarian problem in the Gracchan period see M. T. Frederiksen, Dialoghi di Archaeologia, iv—v (1970/1), 330 ff. For the view that the effective working of the reform was brief see J. Molthagen, Historia 1973, 423 ff.Google Scholar
  4. Whether Tiberius introduced a law (Plutarch, On the contribution of archaeology to the agrarian problem in the Gracchan period see M. T. Frederiksen, Dialoghi di Archaeologia, iv—v (1970/1), 330 ff. For the view that the effective working of the reform was brief see J. Molthagen, Historia 1973, 423 ff.Google Scholar
  5. see J. Bradford, Ancient Landscapes (1957), 197 ff.;Google Scholar
  6. R. Chevallier, Mélanges d’Arch. 1958, 61 ff.Google Scholar
  7. On the Roman campaigns in the south of France, many of the details of which are uncertain, see C. Jullian, Histoire de la Gaule, III. 1 ff. Cf. also C. H. Benedict, ‘The Romans in Southern Gaul’, Al Phil. 1942, 38 ff., and A History of Narbo (1941), ch. i.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The representatives of the estate of the late M. Cary and H. H. Scullard 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Cary
    • 1
  • H. H. Scullard
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LondonUK

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