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Coleridge: A Bridge between Science and Poetry

  • Kathleen Coburn

Abstract

One may reasonably ask at the outset why the Royal Institution should celebrate the bicentenary of an English poet, especially one commonly reputed to be anything but a scientist. The answer lies in the remarkableness of both institutions, Coleridge and the Royal one (for Coleridge is a kind of institution in himself); both are characterised by an imaginative facility in looking at the specific in their field of vision, and also at the wider ranges of more general and complex human considerations. It was natural that Coleridge and the Royal Institution, soon after its founding in 1799, should find each other. The view that Coleridge was anti-science is quite erroneous. Nor did he believe in a world of two cultures.

Keywords

Royal Institution Bilge Water Impersonal Pronoun English Poet Chemical Philosophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 3.
    See her letter of 8 Oct 1802, quoted Sir Harold Hartley, Humphry Davy (1968) p. 44.Google Scholar
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    E. Darwin, Phytologia (1800) pp. 560–3.Google Scholar
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    Hartley, op. cit., p. 42;Google Scholar
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    Sharrock, loc. cit., 62, 66; Hartley, op. cit., 25.Google Scholar
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    Marginal note to Aurora in Jacob Boehme, Works (1764–81) I 41–2 (BM copy C. 126.k.1).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Beer 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Coburn

There are no affiliations available

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