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The Japanese Peace Treaty

  • John Wheeler-Bennett
  • Anthony Nicholls

Abstract

Of all the defeated Axis nations in the Second World War, Japan was unique in that her conclusion of hostilities and subsequent return to the status of normal diplomatic relations followed the accepted conventional and traditional processes of an armistice, involving Unconditional Surrender, followed by a period of occupation, followed by a formal treaty of peace. In the case of Italy the situation became somewhat confused by reason of her temporary excursion into the ways of ‘co-belligerency’, which permitted her defection from the Axis to the Allied camp to assume a legal aspect, while with Germany, as of this year of 1971, no peace treaty has yet been signed and, in so far as both Germanys are concerned, their official status is one of ‘non-belligerency’.

Keywords

Foreign Minister Peace Treaty Armed Attack Pearl Harbor Draft Treaty 
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Notes

  1. 16.
    Herbert Feis, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin (Princeton, 1957) pp. 108–13.Google Scholar
  2. 70.
    Sir Robert Menzies, ‘The Pacific Settlement as Seen from Australia’, Foreign Affairs (Jan 1952 ) p. 191Google Scholar
  3. 71.
    Herbert Feis, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin (Princeton, 1957) pp. 108–13.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sir John Wheeler-Bennett and Anthony Nicholls 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Wheeler-Bennett
  • Anthony Nicholls

There are no affiliations available

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