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Demographic Aspects of the Distribution of Income among Families: Recent Trends in the United States

  • Simon Kuznets

Abstract

Family income is the dominant component of the size distribution of income among a country’s population. As of March 1970, families accounted for 185 million out of a total population of the United States of 205 million — the rest being unattached persons and the institutional population.1 And if the family is defined, as it is in the basic source used here, as ‘a group of two or more persons related by blood, marriage or adoption and residing together’ [see S-III, p. 8], it is the unit that makes most decisions relating to employment, other sources of income and the disposition of income received — and is therefore the relevant recipient unit in the analysis of the size distribution of income. But this means that differences and changes in the structure of family units have direct bearing upon the income distribution.

Keywords

Female Head Income Inequality Income Distribution Average Income Family Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Simon Kuznets 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Kuznets
    • 1
  1. 1.Harvard UniversityUSA

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