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Demand for Industrial and Commercial Building

  • Patricia M. Hillebrandt

Abstract

The demand for factories and offices is not dependent directly on the ultimate consumer but on the producers of goods for the ultimate consumer. It is known as derived demand. Its analysis benefits from the concern of economists with the relationships between investment and consumption. The initial discussion will be mainly in terms of industrial building followed by a consideration of the extent to which the same analysis is applicable to commercial building.

Keywords

Construction Industry Demand Curve Surplus Capacity Commercial Building Industrial Building 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Department of Trade and Industry, ‘Minister Gives Detailed Information on Value of Regional Incentives’, Trade and Industry, 27 Apr 1972, p. 146Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Joint Working Party on Demand and Output Forecasts of the E.D.C.s for Building and Civil Engineering, Construction Industry Prospects to 1979 (N.E.D.O., 1971)Google Scholar
  3. Joint Working Party on Demand and Output Forecasts of the E.D.C.s for Building and Civil Engineering, Construction Industry Prospects to 1979 (N.E.D.O., 1971) pp. 119–54Google Scholar
  4. A. D. Knox, ‘The Acceleration Principle and the Theory of Investment: A Survey’, in M. G. Mueller (ed.), Readings in Macroeconomics ( New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969 )Google Scholar
  5. William W. White, ‘Interest Inelasticity of Investment Demand: The Case from Business Attitude Surveys Re-examined’, in Mueller (eçl.), Readings in MacroeconomicsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Patricia M. Hillebrandt 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia M. Hillebrandt

There are no affiliations available

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