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Flow Of Funds Analysis

  • A. D. Bain

Abstract

Flow of funds analysis does not have any generally accepted meaning in economics. The flow of funds account is now well known; it is one component of the national accounts system, which shows the financial transactions between broad sectors of the economy, thus linking the saving and investment aggregates in other components of the national accounts with their associated lending and borrowing activities. Like these other components the flow of funds account is designed to provide a framework which gives a systematic, comprehensive and consistent description and analysis of the facts. It brings the various financial activities of an economy into explicit statistical relationship with one another and with data on the non-financial activities that generate income and production (Goldsmith, 1965; Board of Governors, 1970).

Keywords

Interest Rate Balance Sheet Financial Asset Financial Instrument Liquid Asset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Bibliography

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Copyright information

© The Royal Economic Society and the Social Science Research Council 1977

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  • A. D. Bain

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