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Abstract

When in A.D. 1600 the question was asked in Oxford University’s Arts Seminar: ‘An peregrinatio conducat ad philosophandum?’ (‘Does migration stimulate philosophical thinking?’), the precaution was taken of requiring the students to answer the question in the affirmative.2 The problem of ‘brain drain’ has not been viewed in quite such unequivocal terms in the recent literature on economic development. This is not surprising since a systematic migration of a large part of the skilled and technologically sophisticated labour force from an under-developed country would indeed pose a serious challenge to the economic, technological and scientific development of such a country.

Keywords

Production Function Skilled Labour Brain Drain Unskilled Labour Interpersonal Comparison 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amartya Sen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of DelhiIndia

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