A Comprehensive Approach

  • Centre for Housing, Building and Planning United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Abstract

Two things should now be abundantly clear. Firstly, that the population of the world is growing fast and changing its pattern of distribution on the face of the earth. Secondly, that a large proportion of the world’s population is already living in conditions and surroundings that are unsatisfactory either through poverty and lack of basic amenities or through the adverse side-effects of affluence and advanced technologies. From these two inescapable facts we can draw only this conclusion: we must increase our capacity to feed, house and employ ourselves and meet our other fundamental needs and at the same time reduce the detrimental effects of these activities on our environment. We must do both these things together because a deteriorating environment is not just unpleasant; it affects our very capacity to survive and prosper.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, Regional Physical Planning in Kenya, a case study (United Nations, E/CN.14/HOU/35, 1969).Google Scholar
  2. Israel’, United Nations Housing, Building and Planning Bulletin, No. 12 (New York: United Nations, Sales No. 59.IV.7, 1959) p. 199.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© United Nations 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Centre for Housing, Building and Planning United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

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