The Diffusion of a Major Manufacturing Innovation

  • Edwin Mansfield
  • John Rapoport
  • Jerome Schnee
  • Samuel Wagner
  • Michael Hamburger


Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in the diffusion process, the process by which the use of an innovation spreads and grows. Studies have been made to determine the factors influencing the rate of diffusion and the characteristics of the firms that are relatively quick, or relatively slow, to adopt an innovation. These studies have helped to provide a clearer and more complete understanding of the diffusion process, but they are only a beginning. Much more work is required before a satisfactory understanding is achieved.1


Machine Tool Small Firm Numerical Control Precision Machine Mail Survey 


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  1. 1.
    For surveys of findings regarding the diffusion process, see Edwin Mansfield, The Economics of Technological Change (New York: W. W. Norton, 1968), Chapter 4Google Scholar
  2. E. Rogers, The Diffusion of Innovations (New York: Free Press, 1962).Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute, Technological Change: Its Impact on Metropolitan Chicago (1964), p. 1.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    For further descriptions of numerical control, see F. Wilson, Numerical Control in Manufacturing (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1963);Google Scholar
  5. 27.
    J. Warner, Introduction of Numerical Control Technology to Illinois Industry, Northern Illinois University (September 1967).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin Mansfield
    • 1
  • John Rapoport
    • 2
  • Jerome Schnee
    • 3
  • Samuel Wagner
    • 4
  • Michael Hamburger
    • 5
  1. 1.Wharton SchoolUniversity of PennsylvaniaUSA
  2. 2.Mount Holyoke CollegeUSA
  3. 3.Columbia UniversityUSA
  4. 4.Temple UniversityUSA
  5. 5.Federal Reserve Bank of New YorkUSA

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