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Abstract

‘I am not sure’, declared General Jan Smuts in 1917, ‘… whether in the distant future the South Africa Act will not be remembered as much for its appendix as for its principal contents.’1 This book is in part an exploration of one possible implication in that forecast. The Union of South Africa established in 1910 was in effect a provisional one, bringing together Cape Colony, the Transvaal, the Orange Free State and Natal, and the Schedule appended to the Act of Union (1909) dealt with three further territories which it was hoped one day to include — Basutoland (Lesotho), the Bechuanaland Protectorate (Botswana) and Swaziland. These were known as the High Commission Territories, or ‘the Protectorates’ as they were often called incorrectly. At about the time when Union was established, General Louis Botha, its first prime minister, stated repeatedly his conviction that it would never be complete until Rhodesia and the High Commission Territories had been included.2

Keywords

Prime Minister British Government African Unity High Commissioner Liberal Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ronald Hyam 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald Hyam

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