International Organizations

  • Chris Cook
  • John Paxton


The United Nations is an association of states which have pledged themselves, through signing the Charter, to maintain international peace and security and to co-operate in establishing political, economic and social conditions under which this task can be securely achieved. Nothing contained in the Charter authorizes the organization to intervene in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state.


Security Council European Economic Community International Peace Permanent Member Social Council 


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Copyright information

© Chris Cook and John Paxton 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Cook
  • John Paxton

There are no affiliations available

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