International Collective Bargaining and Regional Economic Integration: Some Reflections on Experience in the E.E.C.

  • Hans Günter

Abstract

Surprisingly enough, for some observers of the European industrial relations scene, economic integration through the creation and operation of the European Coal and Steel Community (E.C.S.C.) and the European Economic Community (E.E.C.) has apparently had a relatively small impact on the relations between trade unions and employers. In particular there has so far1 been no collective bargaining at the Community level, even though the similarity of organisational structures and of the roles of the social partners in the E.E.C. member countries, as well as the Community’s basic supra-national legal framework,2 would have seemed propitious for such negotiations. Furthermore, the diversity in national labour legislation cannot be regarded as an insurmountable obstacle.3

Keywords

Europe Income Coherence Defend Haas 

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Notes

  1. 3.
    See R. Colin Beever: European Unity and the Trade Union Movements ( Leyden, A. W Sythoff, 1966 ), p. 285.Google Scholar
  2. 1.
    See Ellen M. Bussey, ‘Organised Labour and the E.E.C.’, Industrial Relations, Vol. No. 2, February 1968.Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    See Jean-Daniel Reynaud, ‘The Future of Industrial Relations in Western Europe: Approaches and Perspectives’, I.I.L.S. Bulletin, No. 4, February 1968, pp. 86–115.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    Paraphrasing the definition of ‘economic integration’ given by Franz Gehrels and Bruce F. Johnstone in ‘The Economic Gains of European Integration’, Journal of Political Economy August 1955, pp. 275–92.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The International Institute for Labour Studies 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Günter

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