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Tariff Protection, Import Substitution and Investment Efficiency

  • Ronald Soligo
  • Joseph Stern

Abstract

A chronic deficit in the balance of payments is a problem which plagues almost all developing countries. In Pakistan, as in other countries, the development plans have contained a two-pronged approach to the problem: to increase exports and to reduce the need to import through a process of import substitution. Exports have been encouraged by giving numerous concessions and subsidies to the exporting firms1 but the best known and most successful of the export-promotion schemes is the bonus-voucher system.2

Keywords

Foreign Exchange Real Income Import Substitution Domestic Price Official Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pakistan Development Review and R. Soligo and J. J. Stern 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald Soligo
  • Joseph Stern

There are no affiliations available

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