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Miniature Gears

  • R Nichols
Part of the Mechanical Engineering Series book series (MECS)

Abstract

This chapter deals with miniature gears which, in common with their larger counterparts in the power transmission field, may be classified according to application, pitch, and quality. Miniature gears are used in three main application groups:

Low-power gears. This group encompasses the many applications of medium duty gears used in commercial products such as home appliances, power operated hand tools, toys, and small industrial equipment. In this group light or medium power requirements ranging from a few gf cm torque to about 750 W (1 hp), plus motion transmission, are the important functions.

Precision, or instrument gears. This group comprises gears which are usually small in diameter (up to approximately 120 mm) and of relatively fine pitch. Motion transmission, often coupled with high indexing accuracy and low backlash are of primary importance. Their precision ranges from low to the very highest. Applications include instrument drives, automatic control systems including servomechanisms, and computers.

Keywords

Gear Tooth Helix Angle Bevel Gear Spur Gear Helical Gear 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • R Nichols
    • 1
  1. 1.Reliance Gear Co LtdChina

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