Lubrication Principles

  • A L Mills
Chapter
Part of the Mechanical Engineering Series book series (MECS)

Abstract

Engineers are concerned with friction and its effects in relation to the moving parts of machines; the greater the friction the less efficient the machine. Excessive friction may even generate sufficient heat to cause irreparable damage to components. Lubrication is a process for reducing friction, and it takes the form of interposing between rubbing surfaces a material (the lubricant) which may be a gas, a liquid, or a solid (or a semi-solid, such as a grease). The internal friction of the lubricant, which is generally a liquid, is less than that produced by the rubbing together of two dry metal surfaces.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Limited 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • A L Mills
    • 1
  1. 1.Burmah-Castrol CompanyUSA

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