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Rare, Noble & Miscellaneous Metals

  • A. S. Darling
Part of the Macmillan Engineering Evaluations book series (MECS)

Abstract

The rarer and noble metals dealt with in this chapter are situated within or adjacent to the second and third long series of the transition elements as shown in Fig 1. The transition metals occupy positions in the Periodic Table where an incomplete group of eight electrons expands systematically into one of eighteen by the acquisition of ‘d’ band electrons. The resultant tendency towards higher valencies reflects itself in the high strength and high melting point of metals towards the centre of these two long series and explains the importance of these metals for structural and technical applications. Bond strengths diminish as we move to the right of tungsten and molybdenum. The melting points of gold and silver are well below those of the platinum metals and the melting points of tin and indium are close to room temperature.

Keywords

Electrical Resistivity Contact Resistance Platinum Metal Gold Alloy High Temperature Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. Darling
    • 1
  1. 1.Johnson Matthey & Company LimitedChina

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