The Influence of Certain Writers on Jane Austen

  • F. B. Pinion
Part of the Literary Companions book series (LICOM)


Resemblances, especially of detail, between literary works are not hard to find, and are just as likely to spell coincidence as indebtedness. Detective enthusiasm has, one suspects, sometimes led critics to exaggerate the influence of writers on Jane Austen. In her earlier years she reacted critically against certain types of literature, and made them the object of burlesque and satire. The extent of this reaction in her juvenilia has never been thoroughly explored, but it is evident that her early novels owe much more to literary promptings, in detail, and sometimes in theme, than do her later.


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  4. Discussing ‘L.E.L.’ (Letitia Landon), Lamb in 1820 expressed the view that a female poet, or female author of any kind, ranked below an actress: E. V. Lucas, The Life of Charles Lamb, one-vol. ed., 1907, p. 433.Google Scholar
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    Mary Stocks, My Commonplace Book, London, 1970, pp. 130 – 1.Google Scholar
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    Readers familiar with works by both authors will find an in- terestingly illustrated comparison of the techniques of Henry James and Jane Austen in Irène Simon’s ‘Jane Austen and The Art of the NovelEnglish Studies, 1962.Google Scholar

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© F. B. Pinion 1973

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  • F. B. Pinion

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