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Differentiated Agreement

  • Ian Budge
  • J. A. Brand
  • Michael Margolis
  • A. L. M. Smith

Abstract

Our initial concern with the support given to democracy prompted us in Chapter 3 to a further analysis of fundamental procedural relationships as they manifest themselves in Glasgow, this time an analysis of relationships between electors and elected. Although representation gains a key interest from the light it sheds upon the functioning of democracy, the investigation led to a test of many predictions about the agreement of political strata. These derive from assumptions in the right-hand chain of Fig. 1.1, which relate less to the democratic nature of the polity than to the conditions necessary for the continuance of democratic practices. The reasoning summarised in the assumptions leads to the expectation that political activists will display more integrative behaviour than other groups, in the absence of salient and irreconcilable disagreements, and that they will consequently agree more than other groups in their issue-preferences and general political appraisals. This is not to say that activists will agree more on every such preference and appraisal — on the contrary we assume that they will agree less than other groups on issues related to party competition. But it is to say that they will agree more than other groups on the majority of preferences and appraisals.

Keywords

Percentage Difference Current Issue Success Ratio Strong Feeling Labour Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ian Budge, J. A. Brand, Michael Margolis and A. L. M. Smith 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Budge
  • J. A. Brand
  • Michael Margolis
  • A. L. M. Smith

There are no affiliations available

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