Crime and Penal Measures

  • Nigel Walker


This chapter deals with national, as distinct from local, trends in
  1. (i)

    Judicial Statistics for Criminal Proceedings: i.e. appearances in criminal courts and their outcome, whether this takes the form of an acquittal or a sentence.

  2. (ii)

    Prison Statistics: i.e. admissions to prisons, their populations and the lengths of prison sentences.

  3. (iii)

    Statistics of Recidivism: i.e. of persons who are convicted more than once.

  4. (iv)

    Criminal Statistics Proper: i.e. statistics of offences committed, in so far as these are officially known.

  5. (v)

    Clear-up Statistics: i.e. statistics of officially known crimes which are ‘cleared up’. ‘Clearing up’ means tracing the crime to an offender, even if the offender is not always convicted of it. This is the nearest equivalent — although in most ways superior — to the statistics of ‘arrests’ which are published in some other countries (e.g. the U.S.A.).

  6. (vi)

    Police and Probation Manpower Statistics: i.e. the number of persons employed by police forces and probation and aftercare committees.



BRITISH Society Prison Sentence Juvenile Court High Court Criminal Statistics 


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A. Published by H.M. Stationery Office:

  1. The Criminal Statistics for England and Wales (which include judicial statistics for criminal but not civil courts, and statistics for care, protection and control proceedings, hospital and guardianship orders and the use of the royal prerogative of mercy) (from 1857).Google Scholar
  2. Reports of the Prison Commissioners (or, from 1963, Prison Department of the Home Office. From 1962 the main statistical tables have been published in a separate volume.)Google Scholar
  3. Reports of the Parole Board (from 1968).Google Scholar
  4. Offences of Drunkenness (excluding those involving vehicles) (from 1950).Google Scholar
  5. Offences relating to Motor Vehicles (from 1928).Google Scholar
  6. Statistics relating to Approved Schools, Remand Homes and Attendance Centres in England and Wales (from 1962).Google Scholar
  7. Reports on the Work of the Children’s Department (of the Home Office) (nine have been published, at irregular intervals, from 1923).Google Scholar
  8. Reports on the Work of the Probation and After-Care Department (of the Home Office) 1962–5, and 1966–8.Google Scholar
  9. Home Office Studies in the Causes of Delinquency and the Treatment of Offenders (at irregular intervals) and especially:Google Scholar
  10. No. 3 ‘Delinquent Generations’Google Scholar
  11. No. 8 ‘Trends and Regional Comparisons in Probation’Google Scholar
  12. No. 11 ‘Studies of Female Offenders’Google Scholar
  13. No. 4 ‘Murder’.Google Scholar
  14. Home Office Research Studies (at irregular intervals) and especially No. 3 ‘Murder, 1957 to 1968’.Google Scholar
  15. Reports of H.M. Inspectors of Constabulary (from 1945).Google Scholar

B. Unpublished, but obtainable by research workers from the Home Office’s Statistical Branch:

  1. Supplementary Criminal Statistics (from 1949).Google Scholar
  2. Approved School Statistics (from 1956 to 1968).Google Scholar
  3. Approved School After-care Statistics (from 1956 to 1968).Google Scholar
  4. Attendance Centre Index Statistics (from 1962).Google Scholar
  5. Detention Centre Index Statistics (from 1961).Google Scholar
  6. Borstal Index Statistics (from 1961).Google Scholar

C. Other Main Sources (including local sources):

  1. Reports of the Metropolitan Police Commissioners (HMSO, from 1869).Google Scholar
  2. Reports of local Chief Constables.Google Scholar
  3. Reports of local Probation Committees.Google Scholar
  4. Reports of local Children’s Departments.Google Scholar
  5. G. Rose The Struggle for Penal Reform (Stevens 1960), Appendix 1.Google Scholar
  6. F. H. McClintock et al., Crime in England and Wales (Heinemann 1968).Google Scholar
  7. F. H. McClintock et al., Crimes of Violence (Macmillan 1963).Google Scholar
  8. F. H. McClintock et al., Robbery in London (Macmillan 1961).Google Scholar
  9. Cambridge Department of Criminal Science, Sexual Offences (Macmillan 1957).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© A. H. Halsey 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nigel Walker

There are no affiliations available

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