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The Conservative M.P.s and the Coalition

  • Michael Kinnear

Abstract

The Coalition fell after an adverse vote by the Conservative M.P.s, and an account of the 1922 crisis must consider why they voted as they did. Another question to consider is whether the M.P.s were divided over the principle of coalition, or whether they rebelled for a variety of passing reasons, none of which conflicted with the basic intent of the leaders to combine Liberal and Conservative forces. This chapter shows that there was one fissure in the parliamentary party, but that only one M.P. in ten rejected the Government completely. The rest mostly voted against the Government at the Carlton Club Meeting because they opposed one or two aspects of government policy or party leadership, not because they repudiated coalitions in general. An analysis in this chapter of the individual M.P.s shows that the division between moderates and Diehards was greater than that between the pro- and anti-coalitionists. This suggests that, although most M.P.s were discontented with the Government in late 1922, more efficient leadership by Chamberlain could have preserved it.

Keywords

Party Leadership Liberal Party Vote Record Safe Seat Home Rule 
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References

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Copyright information

© Michael Kinnear 1973

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  • Michael Kinnear

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