Advertisement

The State and French Society

  • Orest Ranum
  • Patricia Ranum
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

The two principal ways in which Louis XIV’s subjects came into contact with “his” state were through justice and taxation. Whether on a remote Provençal field, in a Norman abbey, or in a Parisian hôtel, the royal judges and tax collectors enforced the King’s will and made his presence felt to all Frenchmen in varying ways according to their social status. Ever since the first Capetians had acted as little more than lords and tenants-in-chief in the eleventh century, their justice and dues had constituted the main secular link binding governed and governor in the society.

Keywords

FRENCH Society Innocent Person Wholesale Trade False Confession Tenant Farmer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. Philippe Sagnac, La Formation de la Société française moderne (Paris, 1945), I, 66–70.Google Scholar
  2. A. M. de Boislisle (ed.), Mémoires des intendants sur État des Généralités dressés pour l’Instruction du Duc de Bourgogne (Paris, 1881), I, 506–508.Google Scholar
  3. Isambert, Recueil Général des Anciennes Lois Françaises (Paris, 1830), XX, 261–262, 400–402.Google Scholar
  4. Paul Hay du Châtelet, Traitté de la politique de France (1666), Chap. V. This text and translation have been supplied by Professor Alfred Soman of Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota.Google Scholar
  5. D. D. Scott, The Suppression of the Reformation in France (London, 1890), pp. 341–344.Google Scholar
  6. Monsieur le Comte de Boulainvilliers, État de la France (London, 1727), II, 526–527.Google Scholar
  7. A. M. de Boislisle (ed.), Mémoires des Intendants sur l’État des Généralités dresses pour l’Instruction du Duc de Bourgogne (Paris, 1881), I, 418–420.Google Scholar
  8. Augustin Nicolas, Si la Torture est un moyen seur à verifier les crimes secrets; Dissertation morale et juridique (Amsterdam, 1681), pp. 7–8, 49–55, 77–78, 152–154, 157, 162–163, 169–170, 188–189.Google Scholar
  9. A. M. de Boislisle (ed.) Mémoires des Intendants sur l’État des Généralités dressés pour l’Instruction du Duc de Bourgogne (Paris, 1881), I, 486.Google Scholar
  10. Charles Wallon de Beaupuis, quoted in Nicolas Fontaine, Mémoires pour servir a l’Histoire de Port Royal (Cologne, 1738), I, cxix–cxxiii.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Orest and Patricia Ranum 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Orest Ranum
  • Patricia Ranum

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations