Control of Manufacture of Electronic Components

  • Samuel Eilon
  • Roger I. Hall
  • John R. King
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Management book series

Abstract

Certain types of resistive components for the electronics industry are produced by an automatic process at the rate of 1200 components per hour. The resistance of these components must not exceed a specified value. Components which have a resistance greater than this value are defective and have to be scrapped. Some parts of the process deteriorate with the passage of time and cause the resistance of the components being manufactured to increase. When this resistance reaches such a value that defective elements are being produced, then the process is stopped and reset.

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Notes

  1. See also: Hall, R. I., and Eilon, S. (1963) ‘Controlling Production Processes which are subject to Linear Trends’, Operat. Res. Quart., 14, No. 3, 279–289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. The methods of performing a regression analysis and carrying out statistical tests on sample data can be found in most text books on statistical methods, for example: Davies, O. L. (Editor) (1957) Statistical Methods in Research and Production (Oliver and Boyd);Google Scholar
  3. Crow, E. L., Davis, F. A., and Maxfield, M. W. (1960) Statistics Manual (Dover Publications Inc.).Google Scholar
  4. See, for example: Control Chart Techniques when Manufacturing to a Specification B.S. 2564: 1955 (British Standards Institution, London) or Duncan, Acheson J. (1959) Quality Control and Industrial Statistics (Irwin, p. 403).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© S. Eilon, R. I. Hall, J. R. King 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Eilon
    • 1
  • Roger I. Hall
    • 1
  • John R. King
    • 1
  1. 1.Imperial College of Science and TechnologyLondonUK

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