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The Failure of Intervention

  • Christopher Andrew

Abstract

FEW episodes in the diplomatic history of the early twentieth century have remained so obscure as the schemes for continental intervention in the Boer War. This is especially true of the part played by France. Delcassé’s motive for favouring intervention was, however, far from new. His aim was to achieve at last the object which had — in the truest sense of the word — obsessed him for almost twenty years: to end the English occupation of Egypt. Since the Fashoda crisis his policy had been to avoid, at all costs, anything which might recognise the English occupation, and to await a new opportunity to reopen the Egyptian question. In October 1899 he believed that that opportunity had come.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Diary Entry Foreign Minister French Press German Government 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    See J. Hansen, Les coulisses de la diplomatie. 15 ans à l’étranger, 1864– 1879 (Paris, 1880); L’ambassade à Paris du Baron de Mohrenheim (Paris, 1906).Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    M. Buchanan, Ambassador’s Daughter (London, 1958), 43–4.Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    Sir J. Rennell Rodd, Social and Diplomatic Memories (London, 1923), ii, 266.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Meyendorff, op. cit., II, 453. The available evidence suggests, however, that there had been some cooling of the Russian government’s original enthusiasm for intervention. See W. Langer, The Diplomacy of Imperialism, 2nd ed. (New York, 1950), 665–7.Google Scholar
  5. 2.
    Jezierski Had, for example, clearly been shown Noailles’ letters of 29 Oct. and 2 Nov. 1899 (DDF1, xv, nos. 287, 290).Google Scholar
  6. 1.
    P. Renouvin, La politique exterieure de Th. Delcassé, 1898–1905, cyclo-styled lecture course (Paris, 1962), 34.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Christopher Andrew 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Andrew
    • 1
  1. 1.CambridgeUSA

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