Postwar Economic Problems

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

Even during the war attention had been given to planning for the relief of war-torn areas of Europe. A United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration was created in 1943, the financial burden of relief to be shared by United Nations members whose countries had not been subjected to war damage, in proportion to their national incomes. UNRRA was conceived as an organization to provide only temporary relief. The major part of its assistance went to the devastated regions of central and eastern Europe and significantly reduced suffering there. But in spite of the efforts of UNRRA and of other limited relief measures, European recovery stalled in 1947. It became clear that more than temporay relief was required. In June, 1947, the United States Secretary of State, George C. Marshall, in a now famous speech at Harvard University, proposed that the European nations jointly survey their needs and formulate a program of recovery upon which American assistance could be based. The following selection on the problems of European recovery is taken from the report prepared in response to Secretary Marshall’s invitation.

Keywords

Europe Shipping Income Turkey Tempo 

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Notes

  1. Committee of European Economic Cooperation, General Report, Vol. I (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1947), pp. 3–8, with deletions.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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