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Strategic Bombing and the German War Economy

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

The Second World War provided the first major test of strategic bombing as a means of destroying a nation’s ability to produce the goods necessary for modern warfare. In theory Germany was a good target for strategic bombing—a highly capitalized country with large concentrations of industrial plant. Between 1942 and the end of the war the Allies delivered an unprecedented bomb tonnage over Germany. By 1945 the average monthly delivery of combined British and American forces had risen to 170,000 tons. Yet the effects of this massive bombing were not clear at the time. After the war a thorough investigation undertaken by the United States Strategic Bombing Survey revealed that strategic bombing had not been so effective as had been hoped. The selection that follows is taken from the summary and conclusions of this exhaustive study.

Keywords

Machine Tool German Economy Cent Loss Aviation Gasoline Machine Tool Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. The United States Strategic Bombing Survey. Overall Effects Division, The Effects of Strategic Bombing on the German War Economy (Washington, D.C.: n.p., 1945), pp. 6–14, with deletions.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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