Advertisement

The Straining of Productive Capacity: The Russian Example

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

As the war dragged on it became clear that some of the belligerents were not able to meet the economic strains it imposed. Italy, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, all relatively underdeveloped economically, found their limited resources overtaxed by the war and had difficulties in organizing for total war. The problem was particularly acute in Russia where economic weakness was combined with the inability of the bureaucratic central government to recognize the need for economic mobilization and to carry out that mobilization effectively. The government acted belatedly to control allocation of materials or prices, a problem intensified by the fact that the Russian war effort was financed largely by increased issue of paper currency. The demands of the immense army absorbed the greater part of the production of both heavy and light industry and this starved the consumer market. The following report describes the serious problems of falling production and rising prices faced by the Russian metals industry.

Keywords

Cast Iron Blast Furnace Private Market Civic Organization Economic Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations