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Unemployment Relief in Nazi Germany

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

Between 1930 and 1932 the governments of Germany had met the economic crisis with a series of emergency decrees designed primarily to keep the state solvent through deflationary measures. Wages, rents, pensions, and relief payments were drastically reduced (see document 29B, the Report of the Special Advisory Committee of the Bank for International Settlements). While it is understandable that, after the experience of 1923, the German government was concerned not to endanger the soundness of the currency by incurring large budgetary deficits, the measures taken did nothing to reduce unemployment or restore production. The National Socialist Government, which came to power early in 1933, adopted an entirely different, but now familiar, approach, expanding public expenditures to restore economic activity. The resources of the state were used to create jobs through public-works measures, subsidies, and tax concessions. The document that follows, the Law for the Reduction of Unemployment of June 1, 1933, was the first of a series of “pump-priming” measures put into effect by the Nazis.

Keywords

Unemployed Worker Finance Office International Settlement National Employment Calendar Quarter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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