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The Agricultural Crisis

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

From the middle of the 1920’s the terms of trade turned against primary products, and agricultural and raw materials prices were depressed. A “scissors crisis” on a world-wide scale began to emerge. When the full force of the financial crisis hit Europe, it brought a worsening of agrarian conditions as prices and foreign trade continued to decline and credit dried up. The European countries most severely shaken by the agricultural crisis were the economically underdeveloped food exporters of the East. By June, 1931, the Economic Committee of the League of Nations had prepared an extensive report on the situation. The selections that follow are taken from the introductory statement and the report on the conditions in Poland prepared for the League by the head of the Polish land bank.

Keywords

Economic History Agrarian Condition Custom Duty Food Exporter Agricultural Prex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. League of Nations, Economic Committee, The Agricultural Crisis, Vol. I (Geneva: League of Nations, 1931), pp. 7–8, 245–53, with deletions.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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