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A Stagnating Industry: British Shipbuilding

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

Britain’s economy, especially, suffered from the dislocations in world trade noted by the World Economic Conference. As early as 1924 the Labour Government, during its brief tenure in office, appointed a Committee on Industry and Trade to study the condition of British industry. This committee, frequently referred to as the Balfour Committee after its chairman, the industrialist Arthur Balfour, documented the depressed conditions of British industry, most notably in a four-volume Survey of Industries published in 1928 and in its final report presented in 1929. The following selection from the Survey of Industries concerns British shipbuilding, a classic example of how excess productive capacity and falling demand could inhibit recovery.

Keywords

Freight Rate Shipbuilding Industry Total Tonnage British Industry Merchant Vessel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. Committee on Industry and Trade, Survey of Industries, Part IV: Survey of Metal Industries (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1928), pp. 371–395, with deletions.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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