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Reconstruction in France

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

Tremendous costs were connected with reconstructing the battle zones in northern France. Within six months after the end of hostilities, the French government decided to support reconstruction with the full resources of public finance, and the Law on the Reparation of Damages Caused by Acts of War of 1919 is evidence of the broad manner in which that task was defined. By the end of 1924, the total cost of reconstruction in the devastated region had been estimated at 80 billion francs, based on claims for damage to 3.3 million hectares of land, 23,000 factories, 5,000 kilometers of railroad, 200 mine shafts, and 742,000 houses, as well as other damages, and the state had by that date already paid out some 60 billion francs in indemnity. Although this injection of public credit into the French economy helped to lengthen the period of postwar inflation, it also stimulated significant economic growth during the decade of the 1920’s. Not surprisingly, the French government continued to insist rigidly upon forcing Germany to meet its reparation payments in order to cover these outlays.

Keywords

Economic History French Government Complete Reparation Fishing Fleet Mine Shaft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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