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Economic Chaos in Eastern Europe

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie
Part of the The Documentary History of Western Civilization book series (DHWC)

Abstract

Almost every element of the prewar economic life of central and eastern Europe seemed to have disintegrated during the war and the years immediately following. What caught the attention of western Europeans was the intensity of famine and disease in the region; relief missions were dispatched and conditions improved somewhat, particularly in Vienna, as a result. A British mission to central Europe, headed by Sir William Goode, arrived at the beginning of 1919. Goode’s reports on the general activities of the mission during 1919 and its work in Poland in that year indicate the extent of suffering. But they also reflect many other aspects of economic dislocation arising from the creation of new states.

Keywords

Military Expenditure Eastern EUROPE Polish Government Frontier Point Industrial Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. This selection is taken from two reports by Sir William Goode, British Director of Relief, published in Economic Conditions in Central Europe, I (Cd. 521) (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), pp. 7–10Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shepard B. Clough
  • Thomas Moodie
  • Carol Moodie

There are no affiliations available

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