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The Economy

  • Philip Ouston

Abstract

Although the French agricultural labour force is shrinking rapidly (43 per cent of the working population in 1906, 37 per cent in 1936 and 15 per cent in 1968), this sector of employment is still proportionately larger in France than in Western Germany (10 per cent), Holland (8 per cent), the United States (5 per cent) and the United Kingdom (3 per cent).1

Keywords

Rail Transport French Economy Agricultural Labour Force French Agriculture French Industry 
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Notes

  1. 2.
    M. Faure, Les Paysans dans la société française (Paris, 1966) pp. 56–60.Google Scholar
  2. J. Fourastié and H. Montet, L’Économie française dans le monde (Paris, 1950) pp. 104–10.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    J.-M. Jeanneney, Forces et faiblesses de l’économie française, 1945– 1959 (Paris, 1959) p. 70.Google Scholar
  4. 12.
    J.-J. Servan-Schreiber, Le Défi américain (1967).Google Scholar
  5. J.-J. Servan-Schreiber, Le Défi américain (1967). See also C. Layton, ‘European Pygmies, American Giant’, Encounter (Apr 1967).Google Scholar
  6. 15.
    R. Clozier, Géographie de la France (Paris, 1967) p. 87.Google Scholar
  7. R. Clozier, Géographie de la France (Paris, 1967) p. 87; A. Shon- field, Modern Capitalism (London, 1965) pp. 86–7; Avril, Politics in France, pp. 161–3, 170–3. Corsica became the twenty-second Region in 1970.Google Scholar
  8. 16.
    See pp. 212–13 and W. S. Shirer, The Collapse of the Third Republic (New York, 1969) pp. 236–8.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Philip Ouston 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Ouston

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