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Post-War France

  • Philip Ouston

Abstract

Amid the inevitable anger and disorder of France’s violent liberation, many pro-Nazi or Vichy administrators, propagandists and militiamen, black-market and other profiteers of the German occupation were shot with little ceremony. Some private vendettas were also settled by the guns of the maquis, and a political purge of unknown dimensions was carried out, under cover of patriotic vengeance, by the Communist Francs-Tireurs et Partisans and the Milices Patriotiques. The total number of summary executions was wildly exaggerated by the ex-Vichy right wing after the war, the official figure of 10,000 being raised to 60,000, 100,000 and even 120,000.1

Keywords

Prime Minister Sacred Grove French People Overseas Territory French Republic 
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Notes

  1. 5.
    C. de Gaulle, Mémoires d’espoir (Paris, 1970) p. 9.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    E. Behr, The Algerian Problem (London, 1961) pp. 49–53.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Werth, France, 1940–1955, pp. 358–9; Williams, Crisis, p. 26; G. Depeux, La France de 1945 à 1965 (Paris, 1969) p. 32.Google Scholar
  4. 8.
    Werth, France, 1940–1955, p. 360; A. Grosser, La IVe République et sa politique extérieure, 2nd ed. (Paris, 1967).Google Scholar
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    J. Lacouture, De Gaulle (Paris, 1965) pp. 146–51; Werth, De Gaulle, pp. 192–225; Williams, Crisis, pp. 32, 132–47.Google Scholar
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    Radio and TV broadcast, 16 Sep 1959 (C. de Gaulle, Discours et messages, HI(Paris, 1970) 117–23, translated in Behr, The Algerian Problem, pp. 155–8).Google Scholar
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    Radio and TV broadcast, 29 Jan i960 (de Gaulle, Discours et messages, in 162–6, translated in Behr, The Algerian Problem, pp. 247– 51).Google Scholar
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    ‘No Prime Minister since 1875 lasted continuously in office so long as Pompidou’ (Blondel and Drexel Godfrey, Jr, Government, p. 50). The results of elections to the National Assembly since 1962 are given in the table below (in millions of votes). These figures are for the first only of the two ballots held in most constituencies under the present electoral law (see above, pp. 150–1). Figures in brackets show the numbers of deputies elected in each group (P. Williams, French Politicians and Elections 1951–69 (Cambridge 1970).Google Scholar
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  12. I. Murdoch, Sartre: Romantic Rationalist (Cambridge, 1953); P. M. Thody, J.-P. Sartre: A Literary and Political Study (London, 1960).Google Scholar
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    L’Existentialisme est un humanisme (1946). Sartre’s fundamental philosophical works are L’ Être et le néant: essai d’ontologie phénoménologique (1943), Critique de la raison dialectique (i960) and LTdiot de la famille: Gustave Flaubert de 1821 à 1857 (1971– ).Google Scholar
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  15. R. Pierce, Contemporary French Political Thought (Oxford, 1966); P. M. Thody, Albert Camus, 1913–1960 (London, 1961).Google Scholar
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    J. Guicharnaud, Modern French Theatre from Giraudoux to Beckett (New Haven, 1961).Google Scholar
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    See especially André Breton, quoted in Chapter 9, n. 28, and J.-P. Sartre, ‘Qu’estce que la littérature?’, in Situations, II (Paris, 1948) 55–330.Google Scholar
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    See Pierce, Contemporary French Political Thought, pp. 174–7; Sartre, Questions de méthod (1960).Google Scholar
  19. 32.
    A. Malraux, Antimémoires (Paris, 1967) p. 20.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Philip Ouston 1972

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  • Philip Ouston

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