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John Locke pp 129-137 | Cite as

Theology and Religion

  • J. D. Mabbott
Chapter
Part of the Philosophers in Perspective book series

Abstract

Locke argues that the idea of God is not innate, because children and many races of men do not have it;1 and because among those who do have it there are many different ideas of God.2 Thus ‘the truest and best notions men had of God were not imprinted but acquired by thought and meditation and a right use of their faculties’.3

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Notes

  1. 11.
    Stillingfleet, Works, 1720, Vol. III, p. 508Google Scholar
  2. 31.
    Stillingfleet, Works, 1720, Vol. III, p. 509Google Scholar
  3. 33.
    Stillingfleet, Works, 1720, VoI. III pp. 564,Google Scholar

Copyright information

© J. D. Mabbott 1973

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  • J. D. Mabbott

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