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The Development of Inventions

  • John Jewkes
  • David Sawers
  • Richard Stillerman

Abstract

Although when this work was started it was not intended to say anything in detail about the development of inventions, it subsequently became increasingly apparent that some comment on it was unavoidable. For even those who are prepared to accept the description and analysis of invention as given in the foregoing pages might well protest that this is, after all, the less important part of the story of technical progress and that the real determinants of the rate of advance will be the scale and the speed of the efforts made to perfect new commodities and devices and to contrive ways of producing them cheaply and in quantity.1

Keywords

Steam Turbine Technical Knowledge Development Cost Automatic Transmission Viscose Rayon 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    For a very interesting account of how, in the efforts to get quick results, a good deal of wasted effort has necessarily to be tolerated, see the account of the development of the I.C.I. sodium process for the making of titanium. R. B. Mooney and J. J. Gray, ‘I.GI.’s New Titanium Process’, I.C.I. Magazine, June 1956. Of coursc the outstanding example of prodigal expenditure in the interests of speed is that of the development of the first atom bomb.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    The authoritative story is told in the report of the Monopolies and Restrictive Practices Commission, Report on the Supply of Insulin, 1952.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Jewkes, David Sawers and Richard Stillerman 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Jewkes
  • David Sawers
  • Richard Stillerman

There are no affiliations available

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