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Nylon and Perlon

  • John Jewkes
  • David Sawers
  • Richard Stillerman

Abstract

Nylon was the first of the truly synthetic fibres. Its inventor, Wallace H. Carothers, by his work on the synthesis and structure of high molecular weight polymers, added greatly to scientific knowledge and, through the elucidation of the theory of fibre structure, paved the way to the discovery of other commercially useful synthetic fibres.

Keywords

Adipic Acid Penicillium Notatum Sebacic Acid High Molecular Weight Polymer Synthetic Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    ‘Nylon’, Fortune, July 1940.Google Scholar
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    Irvin, H. H., ‘Nylon Polyamides — Their Chemical and Industrial Application’, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, May 1945.Google Scholar
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    Hill, Rowland, ‘Synthetic Fibres in Prospect and Retrospect’, Journal of Society of Dyers and Colourists, May 1952.Google Scholar
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    Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, vol. 10, 1953, p. 916.Google Scholar
  5. 1.
    Adams, Roger, Biographical Memoir of Wallace Hume Car others.Google Scholar
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    Hunt, Jas. K., Nylon: Development, Physical Properties and Present Status, publication of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc.Google Scholar
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    Shor, Morton, ‘Nylon’, Journal of Chemical Education, Feb. 1944.Google Scholar
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    Urquhart, A. R., Hegan, H. J., Loasby, G., ‘The Development of Some Man Made Fibres’, Annual Conference of the Textile Institute, 1951.Google Scholar
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    Schlack, P., The Historical Development of Polyamide Fibre Materials, Textil Industrie, July 1954.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Jewkes, David Sawers and Richard Stillerman 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Jewkes
  • David Sawers
  • Richard Stillerman

There are no affiliations available

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