Shade is a rarity of light. The amorphous qualities of shade are not to be confused with the definable contours of shadow. Not only is shade a subversion of what Maurice Blanchot has called “the optical imperative” of the western tradition, it is also a suspension of the Platonic binaries that define knowledge and ignorance. In the arc between these polarities, shade transforms to tone, and knowledge fades to intimation. If we can know rarity, we know it as we know shade.


Oxford English Dictionary Western Tradition Amorphous Quality Poetic Language Collect Poetry 


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