Introduction

Out of the House: On the Global History of UNESCO, 1945–2015
  • Poul Duedahl

Abstract

In the era of globalization, there is a need for research which explains the cause and the importance of transnational phenomena that affect people’s lives. International organizations are obvious objects of analysis in order to achieve a deeper understanding of some of the more prominent and organized transnational issues characterizing the 20th century because they are specific places — headquarters with offices, meeting rooms and conference facilities — where people meet beyond national borders and exchange knowledge.1

Keywords

Tated Tral Egypt Indonesia Congo 

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Notes

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© Poul Duedahl 2016

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  • Poul Duedahl

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