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The DH Accident and Emergency Department Model: A National Generic Model Used Locally

  • A. Fletcher
  • D. Halsall
  • S. Huxham
  • D. Worthington
Part of the The OR Essentials series book series (ORESS)

Abstract

The Department of Health (DH) Accident and Emergency (A&E) simulation model was developed by Operational Research analysts within DH to inform the national policy team of significant barriers to the national target, for England, that 98% of all A&E attendances are to be completed (discharged, transferred or admitted) within 4 hours of arrival by December 2004. This paper discusses why the model was developed, the structure of the model, and the impact when used to inform national policy development. The model was then used as a consultancy tool to aid struggling hospital trusts to improve their A&E departments. The paper discusses these experiences with particular reference to the challenges of using a ‘generic’ national model for ‘specific’ local use.

Keywords

National Health Service Discrete Event Simulation Nursing Adviser Winter Simulation National Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Operational Research Society 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Fletcher
    • 1
  • D. Halsall
    • 1
  • S. Huxham
    • 1
  • D. Worthington
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of HealthLeedsUK
  2. 2.Lancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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