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2001: Information Technology and the U.S. Productivity Revival: a Review of the Evidence

  • Kevin J. Stiroh

Abstract

The US productivity revival is by now well known, and because US firms have invested trillions of dollars in information technology (IT), there is considerable interest among the business community, policy-makers, and academics in the role of IT. However, it is quite difficult simply to measure IT accurately; and quantifying the impact on productivity is even more difficult. Nonetheless, a substantial body of evidence is accumulating that suggests IT has played an important role in the US productivity revival.

Keywords

Productivity Growth Total Factor Productivity Federal Reserve Productivity Gain Total Factor Productivity Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kevin J. Stiroh 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin J. Stiroh
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Reserve Bank of New YorkUSA

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