Spreading the Fear: The Global Empire

  • Geoffrey R. Skoll


This chapter treats the establishment of the foundation of the postmodern empire that took place in the last two decades of the twentieth century and was realized in the twenty-first century. Two occurrences demarcate the era: the end of the Cold War and 9/11. These historical developments made manifest changes in the world capitalist system. The historical developments and changes in capitalism were represented in the ideological discourses of neoliberalism and neoconservatism. Although these two terms appear opposed, they are just different emphases of the same social philosophy. Neoliberalism stresses economics, and neoconservatism stresses politics. Together they discursively represent the way the empire was formed in the late twentieth century. That they are but representations should always be borne in mind, especially because the prevailing bourgeois world-view tends toward idealism in which ideas, philosophies, and discourses cause materialist social relations. Neoliberalism did not cause the global extension and intensification of capital in the late twentieth century, nor did neoconservatism cause the deployment of a global empire with its center in the United States. Neoliberalism and neoconservatism were and are nothing more than rationalizations for how relations of production changed and thereby all social and political relations changed in their train. Nonetheless, these two discourses offer some helpful insights into the events of that period.


Security Council Liberal Democracy Methodological Individualism Marshall Plan Death Squad 


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© Geoffrey R. Skoll 2016

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  • Geoffrey R. Skoll

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