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Abstract

Free-market ideology is lauded around the world, as it is equated with the linear movement toward progress. However, some economists such as Amartya Sen and Joseph Stiglitz offer stinging indictments of how global financial institutions hinder economic and human development through unregulated or under-regulated “free” market models. Similarly, feminist political philosophers, such as Martha Nussbaum, also expose the exacerbation of inequities, especially among poor women and children, due to unfettered market forces. There has been minimal literature on religious critiques of neoliberal economy, and particularly, its “myth of progress.” There needs to be an intervention here.

Keywords

Human Trafficking Shadow Economy Poor Woman Capitalist Process Labor Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Keri Day 2016

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  • Keri Day

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